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Editorial Results (free)

1. Iranian hackers said to target presidential campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Microsoft said Friday that hackers linked to the Iranian government targeted a U.S. presidential campaign, as well as government officials, media targets and prominent expatriate Iranians.

2. Not just Ukraine: Trump now calls for China to probe Bidens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is publicly encouraging China to investigate Democratic political rival Joe Biden, snubbing his nose at an impeachment inquiry into whether a similar, private appeal to another foreign government violated his oath of office.

3. Not just Ukraine, Trump now calls for China to probe Bidens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, ensnared in an impeachment inquiry over his request that Ukraine investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, on Thursday called on China to do the same.

4. McConnell: Senate must take up impeachment if House approves -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that Senate rules would require him to take up any articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump if approved by the House, swatting down talk that that the GOP-controlled chamber could dodge the matter entirely.

5. GOP split over impeachment pushback as Democrats plow ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The president's lawyer insists the real story is a debunked conspiracy theory. A senior White House adviser blames the "deep state." And a Republican congressman is pointing at Joe Biden's son.

6. GOP split over impeachment pushback as Democrats plow ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The president's lawyer insists the real story is a debunked conspiracy theory. A senior White House adviser blames the "deep state." And a Republican congressman is pointing at Joe Biden's son.

7. Biden launches 2020 bid warning 'soul' of America at stake -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Vice President Joe Biden formally joined the crowded Democratic presidential contest on Thursday, declaring the "soul of this nation" at stake if President Donald Trump wins re-election.

8. Democrats raise $75M so far, signaling a drawn-out fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates raised about $75 million during the first quarter of the 2020 election, a lackluster sum spread out across more than a dozen campaigns that signals a drawn-out battle likely lies ahead.

9. Sanders takes early fundraising lead -

A handful of Democratic presidential candidates are touting the amount of money they've raised in the first fundraising period of a 2020 primary fight that will last into next spring. The totals for the first quarter, which ran through March 31, are the first measure of how candidates are faring.

10. Front’s an affront! Why city went to numbered streets -

Once upon a time, Nashville’s north-south street names evoked living and natural things: Famous people. Trees. Seasons. Burbling waters. Here’s how we went astray. And who’s to blame.

11. 2 stages, up to 20 candidates in first 2 Democratic debates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The first two Democratic presidential debates for the 2020 election will have two heats with room for a total of 20 candidates who meet certain polling or grassroots fundraising thresholds.

12. Big donors on the sidelines in early days of 2020 primary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential primary is jolting to life without a traditional mainstay: the big money donor class. More specifically, their contribution checks.

With as many as two dozen Democrats potentially running for the White House and no immediate front-runner, the money race in the early days of the primary is largely frozen, according to fundraisers. Though some donors have a preferred candidate, others who are spending are spreading their money across the field to hedge their bets. More often, donors are staying on the sidelines until the contours of the primary take shape.

13. Midterms reveal South split along urban, rural differences -

ATLANTA (AP) — The Solid South is no more. A century of rule by "Southern Democrats" followed by a generation of Republican domination is evolving into something more complex.

This month's midterms revealed a South that is essentially splitting in two. In states like Georgia and Texas, population growth and strong minority turnout propelled liberal Democrats such as Stacey Abrams and Beto O'Rourke to come close to statewide victories once thought impossible. Yet the Old Confederacy states in between are mostly holding to form, with white majorities giving President Donald Trump high marks and conservatives a clear advantage going forward.

14. Tax law limit on deductions looms large in some House races -

CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) — Congressman Leonard Lance voted last December with the interests of his northern New Jersey district in mind when he opposed his own party's sweeping tax overhaul.

The cap on deductions for state and local taxes that was part of the Republican plan was bound to mean that many people in the high-tax state would pay more.

15. Takeaways from the 2018 primary season -

The stage is set for a November brawl that could loosen President Donald Trump's grip on Washington.

Elections in New York Thursday marked the end of a long, dramatic and sometimes tumultuous primary season that reshaped both parties going into the midterm elections.

16. Primary takeaways: Establishment loses, diversity grows -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump got his man in battleground Florida, but he watched a prominent immigration ally fall in Arizona in what was another eventful night in the 2018 midterm season.

17. Analysis: With Cohen plea, GOP faces familiar Trump quandary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Moments after Donald Trump's former personal attorney implicated the president of the United States in a felony, Sen. John Cornyn declared "People who do bad things, who break the law need to be held accountable."

18. With Ryan out, focus turns to possible Republican candidates -

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — With Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan deciding against re-election, the focus Wednesday turned to other Republicans who could run for the southeast Wisconsin congressional seat that Ryan has held for 20 years.

19. Ryan bowing out, sending ripples of uncertainty through GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Paul Ryan announced Wednesday he will retire rather than seek another term in Congress as the steady if reluctant wingman for President Donald Trump, sending ripples through a Washington already on edge and spreading new uncertainty through a party bracing for a rough election year.

20. Yet another House chairman giving up a coveted post -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers spend their careers eying coveted committee chairmanships, angling for the chance at the perks and power that came with the top spot.

New Jersey Republican Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen is bowing out after one term.

21. Shutdown deal: Dems face angry base, GOP has hard choices -

NEW YORK (AP) — The first government shutdown of Donald Trump's presidency spanned 69 hours.

That was as long as Democrats could, or would, stand united against a Republican-backed temporary spending bill in pursuit of a plan to protect hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation. When the high-stakes game of chicken ended Monday evening, liberal activists were furious, Republicans were giddy, and vulnerable Senate Democrats were quietly relieved.

22. Dems aim for, and GOP worries about, midterm election wave -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Buoyed by a string of Republican retirements and President Donald Trump's persistently low approval rating, Democrats are increasingly hopeful about their chances for a midterm election wave that would give them control of the House and deliver a blow to the president.

23. GOP's not all that sad; party grapples with Alabama fallout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Weary national Republicans breathed a collective sigh of relief on Wednesday, a day after voters knocked out their own party's scandal-plagued candidate in deep-red Alabama. Yet all is not well in a party confronted with new rounds of infighting and a suddenly shrinking Senate majority heading into next year's midterm elections.

24. Trump's neo-Nazi rally comments thrust GOP doubts into open -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's racially fraught comments about a deadly neo-Nazi rally have thrust into the open some Republicans' deeply held doubts about his competency and temperament, in an extraordinary public airing of worries and grievances about a sitting president by his own party.

25. Republican leaders dance around Trump remarks -

NEW YORK (AP) — One after another, the nation's most powerful Republicans responded to President Donald Trump's extraordinary remarks about white supremacists. Yet few mentioned the president.

The Senate's top Republican, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, condemned "hate and bigotry." House Speaker Paul Ryan charged that, "White supremacy is repulsive." Neither criticized the president's insistence that there were "very fine people on both sides" of a violent weekend clash between white supremacists and counterdemonstrators.

26. It's not EU, it's me: UK files for EU divorce after 44 years -

LONDON (AP) — Britain filed for divorce from the European Union on Wednesday, with fond words and promises of friendship that could not disguise the historic nature of the schism — or the years of argument and hard-nosed bargaining ahead as the U.K. leaves the embrace of the bloc for an uncertain future as "global Britain."

27. Brexit explained: What's next on the UK's road out of the EU -

LONDON (AP) — The British government announced Monday that it will formally begin its exit from the European Union on March 29. Prime Minister Theresa May will invoke Article 50 of the key EU treaty, the official start of the two-year divorce process.

28. Brexit explained: What's next on the UK's road out of the EU -

LONDON (AP) — Britain's Parliament has told Prime Minister Theresa May she can file for divorce from the European Union. She will send the formal letter by the end of March. Then comes the hard part — the arguments, the lawyers, the squabbles over money.

29. U.S. Chamber of Commerce to run congressional ads -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is launching ads in Florida, Missouri, Hawaii and Ohio as Democrats struggle to hold Senate seats and their slim majority. The Republican-friendly lobbying group is also targeting 17 House races from New York to Minnesota.