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Editorial Results (free)

1. IRS issues guidance on deductibility of business meals -

NEW YORK (AP) — The IRS is making it simpler for business owners to deduct the cost of meals with customers and clients.

The agency last week issued guidance for the deductibility of food and meals under the tax law enacted in December. The law eliminated a long-standing deduction for business entertainment expenses like tickets to shows and sporting events. But it left some confusion about whether company owners could deduct the cost of taking clients or staffers to a restaurant.

2. Despite strong economy, small business owners stay cautious -

NEW YORK (AP) — Although the economy is strong and consumers are optimistic, many small business owners are holding fast to their cautious approach to expansion.

The government's latest estimate of second-quarter economic growth, released last week, showed that the gross domestic product grew at an annual rate of 4.2 percent. Meanwhile, the Conference Board's consumer confidence index rose to an 18-year high last month.

3. Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off.

4. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for April 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

5. Retailers hope for certainty as Supreme Court hears tax case -

NEW YORK (AP) — Retailers are hoping for a resolution this year from the Supreme Court, which hears arguments Tuesday in a decades-old dispute: Whether companies must collect sales tax on items sold in a state where they don't have a store or other building.

6. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 735 homes selling for $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 386, followed by Williamson (316), Sumner (21), Wilson (10) and Rutherford (2).

7. Some Walmart employees get raises, others to lose their jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — For some Walmart employees, the day brought news of a pay raise. Others learned they were out of a job.

Walmart said Thursday that it is boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers and handing out bonuses. The announcement came as the company also confirmed it is closing dozens of Sam's Club warehouse stores — a move that a union-backed group estimated could cost thousands of jobs.

8. 5 things small business owners should know about tax bills -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners are awaiting details of a reported Republican deal in principle on a tax overhaul, the details of which could come soon.

The deal, which would reconcile differences in the House and Senate versions of the tax bill, may answer the question of which business owners will pay lower taxes, and how much of a break they'll get. Both bills have raised the possibility that many owners, including professionals like accountants and consultants, wouldn't see a tax cut.

9. As health premiums rise, small businesses seek alternatives -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small businesses are getting notices about their premium and coverage changes for 2018, and some are making adjustments because of that.

The changes vary depending on the state where a company is located, how many employees it has and how comprehensive its insurance is. But many owners are facing rate increases of double-digit percentages or dramatically reduced coverage — or both.

10. Small retailers aim for emotional ties big chains may lack -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some smaller retailers will tug at shoppers' heartstrings during the holidays, trying to create an emotional experience or connection that a big national chain might not provide.

Store owners are going well beyond the usual holiday decorations and music. Among their plans: Parties where the focus is fundraising rather than profits, events with other stores to encourage shoppers to visit them all, and personal services like merchandise deliveries. The retailers are betting that their efforts — which for some are a year-round strategy — will keep customers shopping long after the holiday season.

11. Women who own businesses find bank loans harder to get -

NEW YORK (AP) — Getting a bank loan is still a struggle for many women who own businesses.

Kirsten Curry has had three rejections in the past six months and is waiting to hear from a fourth bank. Curry, owner of Seattle-based Leading Retirement Solutions, has applied to national banks, a regional bank and a credit union. The problem is that her 8-year-old retirement advisory firm lost money last year as it invested in technology to help it expand. Although revenue has consistently risen and her company has no debt, her expenses last year were a red flag.

12. SBA head sees businesses held back by lack of loans, workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Six months into her tenure as head of the Small Business Administration, Linda McMahon sees a split among small business owners — they are increasingly optimistic, she says, but many are held back by their inability to get loans or find the right workers for jobs that are staying open.

13. Top Midstate residential transactions for second quarter 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

14. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for June 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, June 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

15. Small businesses in clean energy sector still hope for best -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners who install solar panels or help customers use clean energy don't seem fazed by President Donald Trump's plan to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate accord, saying they expect demand for their services will still keep growing.

16. When small stores go out of business, owners ask: Now what? -

NEW YORK (AP) — When small or independent retailers post "Going Out of Business" signs, many ask themselves, now what? That may mean trying again — or forging ahead on a completely different career path.

17. Culture shock: Business owners see need to change their ways -

NEW YORK (AP) — The results of a staff survey jolted Alex Slater into realizing how drastically his business needed a culture change.

About half the 19 employees at his Clyde Group public relations firm said they planned to leave in one to two years, and rated the environment as "average" or "needs improvement." No one agreed with the statement: "I am adequately compensated."

18. Trump's budget priorities set small businesses strategizing -

NEW YORK (AP) — The priorities laid out in President Donald Trump's budget message have some small business owners strategizing how they might benefit from a big boost in defense spending, and others thinking about how to make up for revenue they could lose to cuts in grant programs and subsidies.

19. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for February 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, February 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

20. Big thaw? Looks like small businesses ending hiring freeze -

NEW YORK (AP) — The hiring freeze at small businesses looks like it's finally thawing.

Recruiting is picking up after being dormant at many companies even years after the recession. The factors behind companies' decisions to hire vary, with some anticipating a big revenue kick from the Trump administration's spending plans for defense and infrastructure. Other are responding to trends such as consumers' shift to online shopping, which means more jobs at internet retailers. And some hires are at companies whose customers are suffering from anxiety in the early days of the new administration.

21. Entrepreneurs: Health law changes may mean finding new jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stay in business for yourself or go back to working for someone else?

That's the choice some small business owners and freelancers are worried they may have to make, depending on what changes Congress makes in the health care law.